Dr Ludwig Johanne von Gauss

A talented physicist

Description:

A tall human from the once magnificent city of Wissengilde, Ludwig von Gauss exists outside the world of religion, of fate, and free will. He sees everything as quantities, vectors and equations, almost like a biological computer with mental abilities far beyond the capacities of his peers. He does not so much read facial expressions and body language so much as count blinks and compute probable mental states.

Ludwig has a distinguished career in the field of theoretical physics, where his instinctive feel for complex algebra gave him a tremendous advantage over others. His processing power is rivaled only by his ambition; when he was a mere teenager, he tried to bend a powerful magic artifact to his will, inadvertently demolishing the heart of his hometown. As a result, he was forced to assume a new identity (he was originally named Ludwig Neumeyer) and flee to the greater cities of man, where he was recognized by a renowned Physicist, Georg Dirac, and started on his fruitful career in theoretical physics.

Bio:

When he was a mere teenager, he tried to bend a powerful magic artifact to his will, inadvertently demolishing the heart of his hometown. As a result, he was forced to assume a new identity (he was originally named Ludwig Neumeyer) and flee to the greater cities of man, where he was recognized by a renowned Physicist, Georg Dirac, and started on his fruitful career in theoretical physics.

Ludwig Neumeyer had a distinguished career at the Braun Institute of Physics, being Class Medallist in Physics for three consecutive years and graduating with First Class Honours in that subject. He spent the next three years in industry with the Wright Rail Engineers, before returning to the Braun Institute of Physics to complete a PhD on the quantum structure determination of atoms. This work rapidly achieved an established place in physics literature.

Post-doctoral research at the Bismark Institute of Physical Sciences and a fruitful period as Research Assistant to Professor Hermann Schmidt at Einberg University, working on the standing wave properties of electrons and the resulting chemical line spectroscopy, preceded his appointment as Lecturer in the Department of Sub-atomic Physics at Guildberg in October. Dr Ludwig was appointed Senior Lecturer in the following year.

Dr Ludwig was a greatly influential and enormously liked and respected figure within the Department of Physics. A clear and thoughtful lecturer, he was unfailingly approachable and courteous to students, and was a highly-regarded personal tutor, with perhaps a slightly manic and irregular approach to physics. As one of a prestigious team of theoretical physicists, his research work was central to the development of modern quantum experimental techniques. He was responsible for the solution of several theoretical problems, including the symmetry of time on the subatomic level, and published extensively in the field of electromagnetic fields, his output being characterized by the quality of his work and his attention to minute detail.

A Chartered Physicist, Fellow of the Royal Society of Physics and Fellow of the prestigious Planck Institute of Physics, Dr Ludwig was at various times Honorary Secretary of the Subatomic Group of the Planck Institute of Physics, and instrumental in standardizing quantum mechanics into the Copenhafen Interpretation.

A firm opponent to the interpretation that consciousness collapses the quantum waveform, Dr Neumeyer decided to investigate what the uninformed crudely call magic. To this end, he set up the first Museum of Anomalies (a deliberately misinforming name) to categorize and collect thousands of so-called ‘magical’ items that defied scientific understanding, with the intent to study them from a purely scientific standing point. Ludwig Neumeyer would lock himself away for days at a time to study the artifacts, with no explanation forthcoming. This inability to explain the artifacts seemed to have an effect on Ludwig, who disappeared from the radar entirely three months later, with the name Dr Ludwig von Gauss, apparently to collect stranger and more powerful artifacts to study.

He reappeared on the radar again, having travelled to Crag to visit their vast and encompassing library. Ludwig formed a bond of friendship with the then librarian Magnus Bloodbeard, an intelligent but superstitious dwarf, who was interested in Ludwig’s various theories and (strong) opinions (of almost every subject). Magnus helped Ludwig access restricted sections of the library in his investigations, and the pair remained in contact since. It was through Magnus that Ludwig heard of the wraiths, and the groups who hunted them. When he was brought before the Supervisor for an interview, he was originally turned down for a job in the WHG, being of non-dwarf descent and unstable mind. However, soon afterwards, with the disturbing events unfolding in the Falkreaches, Ludwig was summoned once again before the Supervisor for his mission briefing.

  • After the events of ‘Old Debts’ *

Ludwig, having collected samples of the extra-terrestrial ‘Unwelcome’, the ’Lich’s’ great patchwork rat, possessed Durn’s skin samples and many magical artifacts, decided to withdraw from the party for a while in order to study his findings, retreating to his small house in Port Cormaa, until one of his experiments went disastrously wrong, resulting in a giant fireball that engulfed much of the town. Ludwig’s staff took the brunt of the explosion (protecting Ludwig), but even so, his and many other houses were burnt down, resulting in an angry mob.

Ludwig fled the town in his experimental rocket, which nearly killed him crashing into the sea. His precious work survived the fireball and subsequent mob, and Ludwig later retrieved it, with the unfortunate exception of a certain amount of liquid hydrogen.

By pure chance, Ludwig happened to hear of Blast’s behemoth of a ship, the Name, and caught up with the charismatic, if clumsy, fellow wizard. The two had much to talk about, enthusiastically discussing and debating subjects that would often leave onlookers utterly bemused.

Dr Ludwig Johanne von Gauss

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